Democracy is not a
spectator sport

Archive for August, 2017

OTOC Leaders stand in solidarity as DACA program is threatened

August 29th, 2017

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OTOC Leaders attended the Stand with DREAMers press conference in Lincoln on Tuesday. President Trump has cancelled the DACA program which now puts an expiration date on DACA recipients’ documentation, unless congress passes something like the Dream Act into legislation soon.

OTOC stands with immigrant and refugee families. We offer our heartfelt support for so many young people and their families during this time of uncertainty. Dreamer youth and their families contribute much to our Omaha community and economy.  

Nebraska’s members of Congress can fix this by acting quickly to pass the Dream Act of 2017 and updated, common-sense immigration laws.We need your action today:

Please call your elected officials to ask to ask for their urgent support of the Dream Act of 2017 and updated, common-sense immigration laws.

U.S. Capitol Switchboard #: (202) 224-3121 

Call the switchboard and then work through the prompts to call Representative Don Bacon or Jeff Fortenberry, and both Senator Ben Sasse and Deb Fischer

DACA youth and allies are invited to learn more at an event Thursday September 7th at College of St. Mary Gross Auditorium at 6 pm. 

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OTOC leaders attend seminar with Glenn Loury, race and economics expert

August 24th, 2017

On August 15 and 16th, OTOC leaders Mark Hoeger and Karen McElroy and IPL Executive Director Joe Higgs joined community leaders from across the United States in Houston, Texas to discuss how to work across race and class lines in these polarized times.  Karen, Mark and all of the eighty leaders and organizers present in Houston were part of organizations affiliated with the Industrial Areas Foundations, the largest and oldest community organizing network in the United States.

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Glenn Loury in Houston

The leaders met with Dr. Glenn Loury, Professor of Social Sciences and Economics at Brown University, and  author of Race, Incarceration and American ValuesDr Loury is a leading scholar in the fields of  economics, politics and social structures affecting African American communities in the US. Loury’s work documents the changing face of racism, from the end of Jim Crow laws, to the more recent impact of mass incarceration of people of color. 

The meetings took place in the days immediately following the troubling events in Charlottesville and Loury emphasized that relying on identity politics is not going to result in meaningful change. Rather, he encouraged the leaders and organizers present to keep doing the  patient work of organizing to build relationships across lines of race, class and culture in order to develop strong coalitions of people who will seek the common good of their community, not just narrow special interests.

Mark Hoeger notes that “it made me appreciate anew the importance of what we at OTOC/IPL in Omaha and all the IAF affiliate organizations across the country are doing” in regards to having structural organized efforts to equality through the democratic system.

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To Karen McElroy, the experience was a way to explore what other organizations are doing and how OTOC can improve housing inequality, early voting, and post incarceration programs. On the days immediately after the racial violence in Charlottesville, we came away renewed in our commitment to the careful, patient work of building relationships. 

OTOC leaders learning to do Individual Relational meetings

August 10th, 2017

Fifty five OTOC and community leaders attended the final summer traininGreta and Paulg session about organizing where Paul Turner taught about the most fundamental tool of organizing–the individual meeting.

This  workshop focused on how engage others in individual meetings in order to develop effective public relationships. If you want to build strong working relationships with people, learn how to do good individual meetings.

To learn more about individual meetings, click on these links:

Individual Meeting Chapter from Roots for Radicals

Individual Meetings and Cycle of OrganizingCrowd with Paul at front

Ernesto Cortez teaching about individual meetings

Leaders watched Paul conduct an individual meeting with Greta Carlson, the new Lutheran Volunteer Corp intern with Institute for Public Leadership.

Kevin Graham at front

 

Kevin Graham of First United Methodist challenged all those present to do at least 3 individual meeting by November 13 when OTOC will hold a Delegates Assembly.

OTOC leaders continue their work to reduce housing blight

August 10th, 2017

Paul RomeroFive leaders of the OTOC Housing and Neighborhood Revitalization Team testified Tuesday night in favor of $1.1 Million for demolition of condemned structures in the 2018 City Budget. They also issued two challenges to the Mayor and Council.

In 2011, the City was spending only $240,000/year on demolition and had a backlog of 800 condemned properties. Since 2013, OTOC has successfully advocated that the City spend $1 Million each year for demolition until the backlog is eliminated. The current backlog of  175 structures could be  eliminated by 2020 since the Land Bank will contribute an additional $500,000 this year for a total of $1.6 Million in 2018 for demolition. OTOC advocated for creation of the Land Bank in 2014-15 and stays involved in giving them regular feedback about priorities.

OTOC leaders issue New Challenges

Even when our forward-thinking city initiatives are in place, the process as it is now is moving too slowly,” said Charles Gould of OTOC.  OWH, August 9, 2017

Charlie GouldOTOC leaders also challenged the City to:(1) more quickly register properties qualifying for the Vacant and Abandoned Property Registry; and (2) use the registry fees to secure abandoned buildings so they don’t deteriorate as quickly. OTOC advocated for creation of the Registry in 2015 and Charlie Gould noted that waiting 4 years for properties to go to foreclosure for unpaid taxes is too to long. Instead, he advocated that the City foreclose for unpaid Registry fees within two years or sooner so the property can be rehabilitated instead of demolished.

Creighton Center for Service & Justice student intern Paul Romero presented data demonstrating the “Demolition Pipeline” of neglected homes in Omaha. Karen McElroy and Dave McLeod both reminded the City Council members  that neglected rental properties are aKaren McElroy large part of the problem in the eastern part of Omaha. On May 1, in front of 350 OTOC delegates, 6 of the current City Council members agreed to work with OTOC leaders over the next year to improve the regulation of substandard rental housing. Institute for Public Leadership (IPL)is helping OTOC leaders learn  more about  strategies that have worked in Council Bluffs, LaVista and other cities.

 

 

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